Posts tagged asylum

theillustratographer:

My miniature set (final retouch)

“Abandoned”

Foam core, brass tubes, paint, etc.

This miniature is dedicated to the patients of the Ladd School in Exeter, Rhode Island. Opened in 1908, The Ladd School was essentially a place where infants, children and people of all ages with mental and physical disabilities were brought and forgotten. A lot of the patients did not belong there, however; homosexuality was once considered a disease by many. The neglect, the abuse, the overcrowding, the unsanitary conditions, and the corrupt practices by uncertified nurses and staff became exposed to the public in the 1970s, which eventually led to the closing of the Ladd School. The buildings that remain have been unoccupied since 1994. 

oneheadtoanother:

Ten Days in a Madhouse: The Woman Who Got Herself Committed  In 1887, intrepid reporter Nellie Bly pretended she was crazy and got herself committed, all to help improve conditions in a New York City mental institution.“The insane asylum on Blackwell’s Island is a human rat-trap. It is easy to get in, but once there it is impossible to get out.”  Those words, describing New York City’s most notorious mental institution, were written by journalist Nellie Bly in 1887. It was no mere armchair observation, because Bly got herself committed to Blackwell’s and wrote a shocking exposé called Ten Days In A Madhouse. The series of articles became a best-selling book, launching Bly’s career as a world-famous investigative reporter and also helping bring reform to the asylum.

oneheadtoanother:

Ten Days in a Madhouse: The Woman Who Got Herself Committed

In 1887, intrepid reporter Nellie Bly pretended she was crazy and got herself committed, all to help improve conditions in a New York City mental institution.

“The insane asylum on Blackwell’s Island is a human rat-trap. It is easy to get in, but once there it is impossible to get out.”

Those words, describing New York City’s most notorious mental institution, were written by journalist Nellie Bly in 1887. It was no mere armchair observation, because Bly got herself committed to Blackwell’s and wrote a shocking exposé called Ten Days In A Madhouse. The series of articles became a best-selling book, launching Bly’s career as a world-famous investigative reporter and also helping bring reform to the asylum.